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Lučenec

THIS postcard shows how the centre of Lučenec, the biggest and only genuine town of the Novohrad region, looked in 1921. Towns were much smaller than nowadays, and Lučenec had attained that status by the 18th century, with just 2,711 inhabitants.

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THIS postcard shows how the centre of Lučenec, the biggest and only genuine town of the Novohrad region, looked in 1921. Towns were much smaller than nowadays, and Lučenec had attained that status by the 18th century, with just 2,711 inhabitants. Nevertheless, 223 of them were aristocrats, which meant the whole region's power was concentrated there. Lučenec was also a centre of handicrafts, became known for its bootmakers and tanners and regularly hosted large corn markets. Novohrad county was one of the most affected by the encroaching Ottoman invasion. Thus, after the Ottomans had been decisively defeated, Lučenec witnessed a huge migration from its north, Gemer and Hont regions back to its depopulated south. Some migrants continued beyond the border and settled deep into the southern parts of the Hungarian Monarchy, which nowadays make up southern Hungary and the northern Balkans.

By Branislav Chovan

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