SNS wants fewer VÚCs

THE RULING Slovak National Party (SNS) says that if the government wants to save money on state administration, it should decrease the number of higher regional units (VÚCs).

According to SNS chairman Ján Slota, the number of VÚCs, which are self-ruling regions of the country, each with its own capitol after which it is named, should be reduced from the current eight down to five, or possibly even to only three.

Smer's Miroslav Číž says, however, that it is too early to make these kinds of changes to the country’s territorial and legal divisions, as the VÚCs were only established five years ago. However, the third ruling partner, Movement for a Democratic Slovakia (HZDS) supports the SNS’ plan.

According to HZDS deputy chairman Milan Urbáni, more heavily populated VÚCs would have a greater chance of receiving EU funding.

Paradoxically, wrote the Pravda daily, it was HZDS head Vladimír Mečiar’s government who divided the country’s original three regions into eight back in 1996.

Viktor Nižňanský, the author of Slovakia's public administration reform also warned that Slota's proposal is a step backwards towards state centralization and that it might not cause any savings at all.

Compiled by Martina Jurinová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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