Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

IN SHORT

Fewer people reporting corruption, police say

ALTHOUGH police last year filed charges in more corruption cases than in previous years, the number of people who are willing to report corruption is falling.

According to a police study of corruption in 2006, instead of relying on citizens' reports, the police had to take a more active role in uncovering corruption cases last year.

Tibor Gašpar, the head of the police Anti-Corruption Unit, said for the Sme daily that the situation could have arisen from the negative experiences that some corruption whistle-blowers have had.

Witnesses have to undergo repeated hearings, to confront the accused directly, or to travel frequently to Pezinok in western Slovakia, where the country's Special Court for corruption cases is situated.

Gašpar also said that people who report corruption at the tax office, for example, fear tax audits in revenge.

Transparency International Slovakia head Emília Sičáková-Beblavá says that another problem is that the police are unable to protect witnesses. She thinks that the police should provide anonymity more often.

Sičáková-Beblavá also says that the police need to communicate better. "At the moment the level of police communication isn't sufficient for people to be willing to trust them and take the risk involved in making a report," she said.

Top stories

25 years on, most Czechs and Slovaks still oppose their breakup

More than two thirds of Czechs and Slovaks still believe there should have been a referendum on the division of their common state in 1992.

Vladimír Mečiar (L) and Václav Havel discuss the division of Czechoslovakia in 1992. There was no referendum to support the decision.

No new nuclear power plant planned

The state postpones the construction of a new utility in Jaslovské Bohunice, claiming there is no need for it.

Mochovce nuclear power plant

Parties only protect their market share

Rent seeking behavior and a code of loyalty are not the ways to operate a successful democratic political party.

Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák

Skyline over Jaslovské Bohunice is changing

The four cooling towers are expected to be removed until the end of 2018.

State in mid-December 2017