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Fico negotiates electricity imports

SLOVAKIA should begin importing electric energy from Ukraine, according to an agreement reached between the Slovak and Ukraine Prime Ministers, Robert Fico and Viktor Yanukovich, at a meeting in Kiev on February 26.

Fico's spokesperson, Silvia Glendová, said that the details of the agreement would be worked out soon.

"Thanks to the previous government's decisions, Slovakia is becoming dependent on imports of electricity, and the agreement with Ukraine is of strategic importance for Slovakia," Fico said.

During the meeting Fico also asked his Ukraine counterpart to resolve the longstanding dispute over the KTUK iron ore mining and processing plant in Krivoi Rog, Ukraine.

Construction of the complex began in 1986, and after the breakup of the Soviet bloc, it remained in the hands of Ukraine, Slovakia and Romania.

Fico also expressed interest in the transit of light Caspian crude oil to Slovakia, the Czech Republic and Germany.

In Ukraine, the Slovak delegation signed agreements on transport, support for and mutual protection of investments, and Slovakia's role in the European Union-Ukraine action plan for 2007.

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