Construction of technology park could start this year

Work on the Central European Park for Innovative Technologies (CEPIT) in the Bratislava suburb of Vajnory could start this year, said Axel Albrecht, a representative of CEPIT MANAGEMENT, on March 19, after signing an agreement of cooperation with the Slovak Academy of Sciences.

This year, the necessary road infrastructure and water and electricity networks should be laid, while construction should start next year, and the first three buildings could be built by the end of 2008. If no serious problems arise, the whole technology park should be finished within ten years, Albrecht predicts. He said that the park would accommodate 30,000 people who would work, teach, study and live there. The project expects to create 7,000 new jobs.

The CEPIT science and technology park will be the only centre in Central Europe whose aim will be the support and application of cutting-edge technology in the field of electrical engineering, micro-technologies, IT and micro- and nano-electronics. A technical university on the future site will be built to train and educate future centre employees.

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

News digest: Slovakia still dealing with the loss of its talent

Economy minister promises extensive support for hydrogen technologies in Slovakia. Far-right supporters protested in front of PM’s house during the weekend.

The far-right ĽSNS organised a protest in front of PM Igor Matovič's house in Trnava.

Hospital manners expose the toxicity of Kollár

Unjustified privileges overshadow some good news of the coalition's work. Halloween testing will not be repeated during advent time.

PM Igor Matovič (l) and Speaker of Parliament Boris Kollár

Sulík’s party benefits from the dispute with PM Matovič

The Hlas party of former PM Pellegrini is rising, too.

Economy Minister Richard Sulík (l) was charged by PM Igor Matovič (r) to purchase millions of antigen tests.

Anyone can publish a book. Authors often avoid publishers

Self-publishing is setting a new trend.

Nikoleta Kováčová has published two cookbooks without the aid of a publishing house.