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E.ON may build new nuclear power station

THE SLOVAK government is considering building a new nuclear power station in Jaslovské Bohunice.

After a discussion with representatives of the German E.ON company on March 21, Slovak Prime Minister Robert Fico said that E.ON is the likeliest partner for building a new energy production unit in Jaslovské Bohunice. Fico said that E.ON ranks among the most serious prospective partners of the Slovak government for this project.

The Slovak prime minister has not ruled out other companies from the competition. He expects that the construction agreement between the Slovak government and the investor could be clinched soon.

"The situation with examining this large project in Bohunice will be dramatic," said Johannes Teyssen, chairman of the E.ON board of directors. "We are open to all options, ranging from renewable energy resources to nuclear energy. We are able to run a nuclear power station because we belong to the world's top three companies in nuclear energy production. When we join forces, nuclear energy in Slovakia will certainly belong to the best."

Slovakia runs nuclear power stations in Jaslovské Bohunice and Mochovce. Potential sites where a new nuclear facility might be built include Kecerovce, near Košice, and Jaslovské Bohunice in western Slovakia.

Slovakia had to close one of four units in Jaslovské Bohunice by the end of 2006, and has to close another by the end of 2008. The Italian firm Enel holds 66 percent of Slovakia's dominant electricity producer, Slovenské Elektrárne, and runs most nuclear facilities in Slovakia.

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