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Csáky says SMK will not radicalize under his leadership

The new chairman of the opposition Hungarian Coalition Party (SMK), Pál Csáky, said that continuity would be his highest priority.

Csáky defeated former party head Béla Bugár by 14 votes at a party congress on March 31.

Csáky also said he is not planning any radical changes or behaviour but rather will cooperate closely with Bugár.

During his term, Csáky wants to build the party’s economic program on Christian social principles.

After his defeat, Bugár said he was sure the SMK would not become more radical, as Csáky knows what the current trends are. However, on April 2 on the TV Joj channel, Bugár accused Csáky of lying in order to achieve victory. He said the new chairman lied when he accused him of being in close contact with lobbyists around businessman Oszkar Világi. Bugár believes that this lie considerably influenced the congress candidates’ voting.

He further ruled out the possibility of a split in the party, but admitted there were tensions.

At the congress, József Berényi was elected first deputy chairman for foreign relations, and Miklós Duray, who is pushing for the autonomy of Slovakia’s Hungarian minority, was elected deputy chairman for party strategy.

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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