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A bull in a china shop

SMK party vice-chairman Miklós Duray has an unerring instinct for things that will anger Slovaks even though they are unimportant. For example, he insists on autonomy for Hungarians in southern Slovakia, even though for this he would need 90 votes in parliament, and so far he has only three caucus members from the SMK.

SMK party vice-chairman Miklós Duray has an unerring instinct for things that will anger Slovaks even though they are unimportant. For example, he insists on autonomy for Hungarians in southern Slovakia, even though for this he would need 90 votes in parliament, and so far he has only three caucus members from the SMK. The same goes for his proposal that Hungarians deported from Slovakia after the Second World War receive compensation.

The SMK has it tough. If its politicians focus only on municipal politics, Slovaks don't take them seriously. If they go for major issues such as autonomy and compensation, they instantly become traitors. And yet, ethnic interests are what unite the SMK and bind together its socialist, liberal and conservative strands.

SMK voters, however, should ask themselves whether Duray has their best interests in mind, and whether it makes sense to demand things for 15 years that anger Slovaks but have no chance of being passed. The Hungarian question in Slovakia needs a real answer, but so far they haven't found anyone to ask it.


Hospodárske Noviny, April 11

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