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PSA will not increase production in Trnava

PSA PEUGEOT CITROEN will not increase production at its plant in Trnava as was originally planned, the Pravda daily wrote.

The original plan was to increase production capacity to 450,000 vehicles from the current 300,000, but factory chief Alain Baldeyrou said such an increase was no longer on the table.

"We are not going to increase capacity, only modify the installations," Baldeyrou said. "We are going to produce 300,000 cars per year with two models instead of one."

PSA Peugeot Citroen will invest around €100 million this year and next to adapt its Slovak plant to make a new model, Baldeyrou said on April 16.

PSA plans to make 180,000 Peugeot 207 cars in the Slovak plant this year, up from 51,719 last year. Baldeyrou declined to say when the plant would reach its full annual capacity.

He said the factory would be closed for renovations for three and half weeks in August to prepare lines for the new model launch, planned for 2010 at the latest.

The Trnava facility, worth €700 million, will be a pilot site for the new car.

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