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One in two Slovaks positive about euro adoption

THE INTRODUCTION of the euro in Slovakia, planned for January 1, 2009, has more people in support of it than against it. The Focus agency conducted a survey on a sample of 1,013 respondents between April 3 and 10 that reported that 49 percent of Slovaks feel positively about the introduction of the euro while 43 percent feel negatively.

THE INTRODUCTION of the euro in Slovakia, planned for January 1, 2009, has more people in support of it than against it. The Focus agency conducted a survey on a sample of 1,013 respondents between April 3 and 10 that reported that 49 percent of Slovaks feel positively about the introduction of the euro while 43 percent feel negatively.

Compared with the results of an identical survey that was conducted in June 2005, the positive side increased by three percentage points and the negative went up by only one. Eight percent of respondents in the recent survey did not express an opinion on euro adoption.

Supporters of euro adoption are mostly men, young people up to 34 years of age, business owners, citizens of larger towns, citizens with a higher education and higher wages. Respondents with a more pessimistic view are mainly women, pensioners, people with a lower education and lower income, blue-collar workers and job seekers.

Approximately one-third of those surveyed believe that the introduction of the euro will have positive effects on them and their families. On the other hand, more than half of the respondents said they expect the euro to have a negative effect on their lives.

When asked about the effect that the introduction of the euro might have on the Slovak economy, 48 percent of those polled said they expect a positive influence, while 34 percent expect negative ramifications and 18 percent did not answer.

Compared to when the survey was taken in 2005, the information that is being provided about euro adoption has been improving. In June 2005, 89 percent of respondents said they had heard about the plan, while by April, this number had increased to 97 percent. Two percent of those polled said they had not heard about the planned introduction of the euro and one percent could not recall whether they had heard about it or not.

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