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Tomanová attends EU conference on the integration of foreigners

The integration of foreigners into society as a new dimension of the European Migration Policy was the main topic of the EU ministers' conference in Postupim, Germany, on May 11, during which Slovakia was represented by Labour, Social Affairs and the Family Minister Viera Tomanová.

After entering the EU, Slovakia stopped being a transit zone and started to become a destination for some groups of foreigners. At the end of 2006 there were 6,533 foreigners working in Slovakia.

The Labour, Social Affairs and the Family Ministry began to deal with issues relating to the movement of the workforce, directed immigration, and the integration of migrants. From the point of view of directed legal labour-related immigration, Slovakia focuses on supporting highly-qualified workers who will contribute to increasing Slovakia's overall competitiveness.

The ministry plans to establish a special technical department for migration and the integration of foreigners.

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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