Healthcare union threatens to strike

Andrej Kučinský, vice-president of the Slovak Trade Union of Healthcare and Social Services, said on May 22 that its members will take industrial action if the government does not meet its demands by June 20.

The union demanded a 30-percent pay rise for all medical and healthcare-facility employees.

"We also want the state to pay a contribution equal to 5-percent of the average salary for economically inactive citizens throughout the year, in line with the government’s manifesto," said Kučinský.

Kučinský said the government has not been keeping to its manifesto, as average salaries in healthcare are among the lowest in Slovakia.

The union is also demanding that the Healthcare Supervisory Office carry out inspections to make sure that health insurance companies manage compulsory health insurance funds in a legitimate manner.

Kučinský said the current strike alert has been joined by staff at a total of 72 facilities since it was called on May 21, and that so far it has not been affecting patients.

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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