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Slovakia places 17th in Global Peace Index's ranking

Slovakia placed 17th in the Global Peace Index's ranking of the state of peaceful coexistence in the country.

In the first study of its kind, worked out by the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), 121 countries were assessed. There were 24 indicators taken into consideration concerning the state of peacefulness in a given country, and its relations with other states. The indicators that were taken into account in the study included, for instance, the crime rate, military expenditures, the state of democracy and education.

According to EIU, Slovakia did quite well among the 21 countries in the Central and Eastern Europe region, taking third place behind the Czech Republic (13th place overall), and Slovenia (15th place).

Slovakia was followed by the countries like Hungary (18th place), Poland (27th place), Estonia (28th place), Lithuania (43rd place), and Latvia (47th place). Slovakia was also given high marks in terms of maintaining human rights.

Norway is at the very top of the ranking. Significant differences can be found between the G8 group countries - while Japan placed fifth, and Canada eighth, Germany placed 12th, Italy, France, and the United Kingdom ended in 33rd, 34th, and 49th place respectively. The U.S. took 96th place, and Russia was ranked at 118th place.

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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