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Labour Ministry to lay off 1,501 employees by end of 2007

Slovakia's Labour, Social Affairs and the Family Ministry will lay off some 1,501 employees, including 41 working directly at the ministry, by the end of 2007, said Labour Minister Viera Tomanová on June 7.

Tomanová is complying with the government’s resolution from the end of 2006, according to which there should be a 20-percent cut in state administration employees.

"Reducing the number of employees is necessary from the perspective of increasing effectiveness and saving financial resources," Tomanová said.

The number of laid-off employees stems from an analysis carried out by the ministry, she said, adding that the plans would make the most effective use of the remaining ministry personnel.

By December 31, individual ministry offices will have made 1,460 people redundant. Ján Sihelský, the director of the ministry's Labour Centre, says the Centre plans to adopt several measures to lessen the impacts of the redundancy, such as establishing an independent national project for integrating the laid-off employees into the labour market. According to the project, from 280-300 people should be retrained and reintegrated within a year. The highest number of employees, 78, will be laid off from the labour office in Košice, followed by Bratislava with 66 laid-off employees.

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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