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Slovak diplomat named EU Representative

THE EUROPEAN Union has named Slovak diplomat Miroslav Lajčák the EU High Representative in Bosnia and Herzegovina on June 18.

Lajčák will take up his new post on July 1, replacing Christian Schwarz-Schilling from Germany.

Javier Solana, EU High Representative for the Common Foreign and Security Policy, welcomed the Council's appointment of Lajčák.

"I am delighted that the Council has appointed Lajčák as EU Special Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina on the basis of my recommendation," said Solana. "Ambassador Lajčák is a senior diplomat with wide experience in European and Balkan issues, including as my personal representative for the facilitation of the Montenegrin dialogue."

Internationally regarded as an expert on the Balkans, Lajčák served as an assistant to the Special Envoy of the EU Secretary-General for the Balkans between 1999 and 2001, and later as assistant to Slovakia's former foreign minister Eduard Kukan.

Between 2001 and 2005, Lajčák was Slovak ambassador to Serbia and Montenegro, Albania, and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, based in Belgrade.

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