Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

IN SHORT

Gov replaces appointee for Roma minority

THE SLOVAK cabinet replaced its appointee for the Roma minority, Klára Orgovánová, with Anna Botošová, daughter of renowned Roma violin player Ján Berky Mrenica, on June 20.

Deputy PM for the Knowledge-Based Society, European Affairs, Human Rights and Minorities Dušan Čaplovic said that Orgovánová had not been cooperative, the SITA news wire wrote. She was unwilling to support the government's priorities in its Roma policy, he said.

The post should be held by someone loyal to the government, said Čaplovic, adding that Orgovánová focused mainly on building new housing for Roma while he wants focus more on education, employment, and healthcare.

Čaplovič also said he is against building "ghettos" for Roma and supports integrating Roma into the rest of the population.

Orgovánová denied Čaplovič's accusations and said that he refused to meet with her. She said he did not adopt the mid-term plans that she submitted in January nor the regional plans that her people and the regional governments had worked on for 1.5 years.

"Regarding segregated ghettos, he does not understand the situation at all," said Orgovánová. "We have never supported segregated dwellings."

Orgovánová said she expected to be withdrawn and that she feels she did what was needed during her six years in office.

Top stories

In praise of concrete

It was once notorious for its drab tower blocks and urban crime, but Petržalka now epitomises modern Slovakia.

Petržalka is the epitome of communist-era architecture.

Slow down, fashion

Most people are unaware that buying too many clothes too harms the environment.

In shallow waters, experts are expendable

Mihál says that it is Sulík, the man whom his political opponents mocked for having a calculator for a brain, who “is pulling the party out of liberal waters and towards somewhere completely different”.

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.

Blog: Exploring 20th century military sites in Bratislava

It seems to be the fate of military sites and objects in Bratislava that none of them were ever used for the purposes they were built for - cavernas from WWI, bunkers from WWII, nuclear shelters or the anti-aircraft…

One nuclear shelter with a capacity for several hundred people now serves as a music club with suitable name Subclub (formerly U-club).