Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

SURVEY

Smer still well ahead of SDKÚ and SNS

PRIME Minister Robert Fico's Smer party remains Slovakia's most popular party, the SITA newswire wrote. The Statistics Bureau's Institute for Public Opinion Research conducted a poll from June 1 to 8 on a sample of 1,073 respondents.

PRIME Minister Robert Fico's Smer party remains Slovakia's most popular party, the SITA newswire wrote. The Statistics Bureau's Institute for Public Opinion Research conducted a poll from June 1 to 8 on a sample of 1,073 respondents. Its results show that the coalition leader Smer still enjoys extremely high support of 40.7 percent.

The opposition Slovak Democratic and Christian Union scored 14.1 percent, more than the ruling coalition's two junior members - the Slovak National Party (SNS) and the Movement for a Democratic Slovakia (HZDS).

The SNS came in third with 12.8 percent support and the HZDS followed with 10.1 percent support. The opposition Party of the Hungarian Coalition received 10 percent support and the opposition Christian Democratic Movement came in last with 7.5 percent.

Compared to a similar survey carried out in May, Smer saw its support fall by 0.9 percentage points, while public support for the Slovak Christian and Democratic Union rose by 2.1 points.

Out of those polled, 15.2 percent said they would not vote if there was an election and 13.8 percent were undecided on which party they would vote for.


Compiled by Spectator staff from press reports

Top stories

In praise of concrete

It was once notorious for its drab tower blocks and urban crime, but Petržalka now epitomises modern Slovakia.

Petržalka is the epitome of communist-era architecture.

Safari under High Tatras Video

Marek Stolarčík from Kežmarok filmed unique video.

Illustration stock photo

Slow down, fashion

Most people are unaware that buying too many clothes too harms the environment.

In shallow waters, experts are expendable

Mihál says that it is Sulík, the man whom his political opponents mocked for having a calculator for a brain, who “is pulling the party out of liberal waters and towards somewhere completely different”.

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.