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HISTORY TALKS...

Banská Bystrica

CENTRAL Slovakia's largest town, Banská Bystrica, got rich off the silver and copper mines in its vicinity. The powerful Thurzo and Fugger families controlled the copper mines between 1495 and 1564 and exported its product across Europe.

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CENTRAL Slovakia's largest town, Banská Bystrica, got rich off the silver and copper mines in its vicinity. The powerful Thurzo and Fugger families controlled the copper mines between 1495 and 1564 and exported its product across Europe.

This prosperity drew the interest of enemies, among them the Turks, so the town built a centralized fortified zone in which it safeguarded the most important assets and influential residents.

In the 15th century, the town castle and administrative buildings were reinforced with additional walls and bastions, some of which can still be seen today.

The St. Virgin Mary Church, built in the 13th century, dominated the centre.

This postcard from 1927, a reproduction of a painting by Václav Malý, shows part of the town castle.


By Branislav Chovan

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