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Presidents of Slovakia and Montenegro discuss economic options

Montenegrin President Filip Vujanovic said he wants to invite Slovak businesses to seek investment opportunities in his country's run-down infrastructure on July 11.

The biggest areas for improvement include Montenegro's water-supply network and using the full energy potential of the country, which uses less than 20 percent of its potential, according to UN experts.

Vujanovic made the statement at a joint press conference with Slovak President Ivan Gašparovič after they met in Bratislava on July 10.

On July 11, Vujanovic was scheduled to meet with Slovak business representatives on the second day of his two-day official visit to Slovakia, and express the interest of both presidents in improving the current paltry Slovak-Montenegrin trade and economic cooperation.

Both presidents also said they see great potential in the development of tourism.

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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