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Opposition attacks land trade

OPPOSITION parties have attacked the recent land transactions carried out by the Slovak Land Fund as being non-standard and lacking transparency, the Sme daily reported.

According to the daily, the fund has allocated valuable land in the village of Veľký Slavkov below the High Tatras to people from southern and western Slovakia to compensate for plots confiscated under the previous regime.

Opposition MPs from the Parliamentary Committee for Agriculture visited the Slovak Land Fund on July 2. Although they did not find any evidence of violations of land-restitution laws, they were still not satisfied with the way the process was carried out.

Slovak Democratic and Christian Union MP Pavol Frešo told Slovak Radio that their visit did not confirm that no free plots in the western- and southern-Slovak Trenčín, Nitra, Komárno or Topoľčany districts were available, forcing the Fund to look elsewhere.

The opposition also criticised the speed of the transactions, which took only around 13 days.

The land-allocation contracts were signed by the Fund's deputy director, Branislav Bríza, who was nominated to his post by the ruling Movement for a Democratic Slovakia.

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