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SURVEY

Smer party still most popular

THE RULING Smer party kept its spot at the top of the country's popularity chart this month, according to a new poll.
The survey from the Statistics Office's Institute for Public Opinion Research showed that 43 percent of respondents would vote for Prime Minister Robert Fico's Smer if the general elections were held in early July, an increase of 2.3 percentage points since June.

THE RULING Smer party kept its spot at the top of the country's popularity chart this month, according to a new poll.

The survey from the Statistics Office's Institute for Public Opinion Research showed that 43 percent of respondents would vote for Prime Minister Robert Fico's Smer if the general elections were held in early July, an increase of 2.3 percentage points since June.

The coalition Slovak National Party finished second with 12.4-percent support, which was 0.4 points less than last month. The opposition Slovak Democratic and Christian Union finished third with 11.3 percent, down 2.8 points since last month.

The Movement for a Democratic Slovakia, also a member of the ruling coalition, finished with 11-percent support, an increase of 0.9 points. The Christian-Democratic Movement was chosen by 9.6 percent of respondents, up 2.1 points from last month. The opposition Hungarian Coalition Party followed with 8.7 percent, a moderate growth of 1.3 points from last month.

No other political party reached the five-percent support threshold needed to win seats in parliament during an election.

Eleven percent said they were undecided.

In terms of voter turnout, 17.1 percent of the respondents would not have gone to the polls.

The poll was conducted between July 1 and 9 on a sample of 1,105 respondents.

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