Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

HISTORY TALKS...

Tatras

THIS POSTCARD from 1938 shows a cottage called Zverovka in the Západné Tatry (Western Tatras), which is one of several mountain ranges in the country that bears the name 'Tatras'.

Click to enlarge.

THIS POSTCARD from 1938 shows a cottage called Zverovka in the Západné Tatry (Western Tatras), which is one of several mountain ranges in the country that bears the name 'Tatras'.

Although the word "Tatry" is commonly used in Slovakia, its origin, or even meaning, remains unclear.

The latest theory on the word, developed by professor Rudolf Krajčovič, suggests it dates back to the period when Barbarian tribes roamed what is now Slovakia and Roman armies were trying to conquer them. For the Romans, the land spreading above the Danube was unknown and so they sent cartographers and geographers along with their armies to mark the roads with milestones. According to this theory, Romans used the name "Triter" for the Slovak alpine region, which, in Latin, meant something like 'the road scuffed in rocks.' Later, the name "Tatry" derived from this word.


By Branislav Chovan

Top stories

Bratislava growing high Photo

High-rise buildings sprouting up in Bratislava

Visualisation of the future skyline of Bratislava

LGBTI people in the regions: We change people’s minds

Bratislava will dress up in rainbow colours this August again, for the seventh time. This will be for the Bratislava Dúhový Pride diversity festival. But the colours of the rainbow are less bright in the regions,…

Slovakia’s LGBTI community seeks to expand their rights.

Things that make us different also make us stronger

On August 19, a rainbow flag will fly over the US Embassy in Bratislava to represent the firm commitment of the United States to defending the human rights of LGBTI people, writes Ambassador Sterling.

The rainbow flag flew over the US Embassy in Bratislava in 2016.

Crisis ends in Danko’s defeat

Education minister steps down following Fico’s call, Danko not ruling out he might leave politics.

Former education minister Peter Plavčan and PM Robert Fico on July 24.