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INEKO: Gov't has kept half of promises due to economic growth

After just over a year in power, the Government has managed to keep nearly half of its promises, thus obtaining and maintaining high voter support, reads an evaluation by the Institute for Economic and Social Reforms (INEKO) published on August 2.

Out of the 50 most popular promises, 43 percent are being kept or nearly kept, while 52 percent are not being kept or only slightly kept, the report claims.

According to INEKO, apart from the Government's own activities, it is mainly the current record growth in the country's economy that is enabling some of the promises to be kept.

"Thanks to the healthy economy, promises of higher growth in real salaries, the reduction of regional disparities and cuts in unemployment are being kept. At the same time, the Government has more resources at its disposal to keep financially demanding promises," INEKO's Peter Golias said.

These promises include, for example, the payment of Christmas bonuses to pensioners, state subsidies for mortgages, and increased payments at the birth of a first child.

The results of the study come from a continuous three-year evaluation by INEKO entitled Promises and Lamentations – What the Politicians Promised and What They Are Carrying Out, which has monitored the observance of 181 pre-election and post-election promises made by representatives of the Government.

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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