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Most Slovaks think government won't reimburse pyramid scheme victims

More than 70 percent of Slovak citizens think the Slovak government will not reimburse clients of bankrupt unlicensed deposit companies, according to a recent survey.

More than 70 percent of Slovak citizens think the Slovak government will not reimburse clients of bankrupt unlicensed deposit companies, according to a recent survey.

The Robert Fico-led government promised partial reimbursement of clients of unlicensed deposit companies running pyramid schemes in its four-year cabinet programme. However, no proposal has been submitted yet. Half of the respondents said that the government will definitely not reimburse aggrieved clients of these companies, and about 20 percent thought the government probably wouldn't reimburse them.

More than eight percent of survey respondents believe the government will reimburse pyramid scheme victims, with 1.7 percent of them convinced it will happen.

More than 20 percent of respondents did not give an opinion on the issue. The public opinion poll was conducted by the Polis Slovakia agency conducted in cooperation with the SITA newswire. It surveyed 1,012 people on July 25 and 26.

Fico's Smer, the Slovak Communist Party and the current junior coalition party Movement for a Democratic Slovakia (HZDS) submitted a proposal for partial reimbursement in the last electoral term. Neither the government nor parliament approved it.

The proposal at the time stipulated terms of partial reimbursement for clients of Horizont Slovakia, B.M.G. Invest, Drukos, and other pyramid scheme companies, which cost thousands of clients a total of tens of billions of crowns when they collapsed.

The amount of the reimbursement was to depend on the principal that an investor deposited in the unlicensed company, up to Sk1 million (€30,000). The proposal was estimated to cost Sk3.6 billion (€107.9 million) at the time.


Fico still most trusted politician


Prime Minister Robert Fico is still viewed as the most trustworthy politician in Slovakia, with the trust of 35.6 percent of Slovaks.

The latest public opinion poll conducted by the Statistics Bureau's Institute for Public Opinion Research (ÚVVM) showed the PM and Smer party leader was trusted by more people than in the previous month, the SITA newswire wrote. Fico's trust rating went up by 1.3 percentage points from June.

The runner-up in the poll was President Ivan Gašparovič, trusted by 15.2 percent (up 3.1 points). He was followed by governing-coalition Slovak National Party chairman Ján Slota with 12.3 percent (down one point).

The poll was conducted from July 1-9 on a sample of 1,105 respondents aged over 18.

Other politicians in the top 10 included the head of the junior coalition HZDS, Vladimír Mečiar (10.7 percent); Interior Minister and Smer vice-chairman Robert Kaliňák (8.8 percent), and the former leader of the Hungarian Coalition Party, Béla Bugár (6.1 percent).

Nearly 24 percent of respondents said that they don't trust any politicians.

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