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Time stands still at Budimír Mansion

EVERYONE hurries everywhere these days, but there is one place where time has stopped.
Visitors to beautiful Budimír Mansion, just 12 km from Košice, can explore an extensive exhibit of old timepieces as part of a Slovak Technical Museum exposition.

Historical timepieces, like those seen above but more antique, are part of an exhibit at Budimír Mansion near Košice.
photo: ČTK/AP

EVERYONE hurries everywhere these days, but there is one place where time has stopped.

Visitors to beautiful Budimír Mansion, just 12 km from Košice, can explore an extensive exhibit of old timepieces as part of a Slovak Technical Museum exposition.

The mansion, situated at one end of the village, is built in the Classicist style and surrounded by a French garden and sculptures. Entering the gate with a huge skeleton key, you step into the entrance hallway, to see an old-fashioned camera and an ancient Singer sewing machine.

In the next room you will discover a short biography and some of the most famous paintings of the well-known 19th-century Czech Secession painter, Alphonse Mucha. Secession is a specific artistic style, which lasted only 15 years, and is characterized by its ornaments and curves. In France it is known as Art Nouveau, and in Germany as Jugendstil.

But this is not the core of the current exhibitions in the mansion. There are many old, really very old, clocks in wooden frames, some of which have faces bordered or decorated with tiny, intricate pictures. One is in the form of an old oil painting with clocks in the middle. Other timepieces are displayed in mahogany showcases, along with small alarm clocks. Still others stand on tables or hang on walls.

These old clocks do not work. It seems that time in Budimír Mansion has stopped. Everything there is so ancient.

The wallpaper details the historical background of the clocks, most interesting for historians and history buffs. Particularly interesting is that a trade union for the makers of timepieces existed in most industrial cities, including Košice, Prešov, and Banská Štiavnica, as early as the 17th century.

The mansion is furnished throughout with plush, red chairs and armchairs, couches, ornate tables, and even an old commode complete with elaborate decorative stands and holders designed especially for use by the aristocracy.

It is truly a very inspiring and imaginative exhibit, with timepieces and antique furnishings actually used by many generations of the aristocracy, still here long after their owners have passed from this earth.

For a small donation, you can learn how Count and Countess Ujházy, the owners of Budimír Mansion, lived in the 18th century.

When you leave the mansion and re-enter reality you will have had an unforgettable experience.a


What:Slovak Technical Museum exhibit
When:permanent; Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10-17
Where:Budimír Mansion, near Košice
Tickets:Sk10-20


For more information, call 055/6958-294 or visit www.stm-ke.sk.

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