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SURVEY

Increasing child support is political advertising, survey shows

Three out of four Slovak citizens think that raising child support payments by Sk10 per month (€0.30), as proposed by the Minister of Labour, Social Affairs and the Family, Viera Tomanová, is nothing but political advertising and not a social measure.

Three out of four Slovak citizens think that raising child support payments by Sk10 per month (€0.30), as proposed by the Minister of Labour, Social Affairs and the Family, Viera Tomanová, is nothing but political advertising and not a social measure.

One in five people believe the proposal it is better than nothing, and less than six percent of those asked could not say anything on the topic.

Polling agency Polis Slovakia, in cooperation with the SITA newswire, interviewed a sample of 1,012 respondents by telephone from July 25 to 26.

The state currently pays Sk540 (€16) in child allowance to the parents of 1,284,658 dependent children. The increase, the Labour Ministry said, reflects the expected inflation this year.

Tomanová has also proposed to pay state maternity leave support to Sociálna Poisťovňa, the state social security provider, and not to the expectant mothers' accounts in private pension funds that are a part of the capitalisation pension pillar.

Of those interviewed, 13.4 percent agree with the proposal, and almost a half of them believe it represents discrimination of mothers on maternity leave. Almost 37 percent of all respondents could not answer the question.

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