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Sklabiňa

SKLABIŇA Castle is one of many castles located in the historical county of Turiec. Alas, only ruins have remained to this day because a preserved part on the left side of the castle fell apart. Maybe everything would have developed otherwise, but the medieval castle paradoxically received its biggest and most definitive punch only during the Second World War.

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SKLABIŇA Castle is one of many castles located in the historical county of Turiec. Alas, only ruins have remained to this day because a preserved part on the left side of the castle fell apart. Maybe everything would have developed otherwise, but the medieval castle paradoxically received its biggest and most definitive punch only during the Second World War. Hitler's soldiers burned it in revenge after the castle provided shelter to partisans during the Slovak National Uprising.

Sklabiňa already existed in the 14th century, but was initially overshadowed by the nearby Zniev Castle, which was the seat of the entire administrative region.

Later, Sklabiňa took over its role. From 1527 the castle, including the extensive estate, got into hands of the Révais, an aristocratic family from Croatia fleeing the Balkans due to the Turks. In the Middle Ages, the granting of castles and estates was a way by which the king (at this time the Habsburgs) attempted to place the aristocracy under obligation or to reward it for abidance.

The photo of Sklabiňa Castle with the preserved part dates back to 1929.


By Branislav Chovan

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