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Invasion of 1968 should always be remembered, UPN says

The events of August 1968 must remain a reminder for future generations, said Ivan Petranský, chairman of the board of directors of the Nation's Memory Institute (UPN).

He was speaking on the occasion of the 39th anniversary of the Warsaw Pact invasion into the former Czechoslovakia.

"The invasion of Warsaw Pact troops under Soviet leadership on the night of August 20, 1968 confirmed the perversity of the communist dictatorship, which did not hesitate to use brute force against its opponents in an effort to preserve its influence," said Petranský.

On the night of August 20, 1968, armies from five Warsaw Pact countries crossed the border into the former Czechoslovakia and invaded the country.

During the invasion, Soviet tanks occupied the streets, 72 Czechs and Slovaks were killed (19 of them in Slovakia) and hundreds were wounded.

The invasion was preceded by the Prague Spring, which was a period of political liberalisation in Czechoslovakia, starting when Alexander Dubček came to power.

-SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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