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SNS MP Paška: SNP took on an authoritarian regime

The Slovak National Uprising (SNP) was a step taken by the Slovak people to halt a regime that was seizing control of Central Europe, Slovak National Party (SNS) MP Jaroslav Paška said on August 29.

Paška made the statement in reply to a question about whether he agreed with historians who say the SNP constituted an attempt to overthrow the state.

"The Slovak nation proved that it was inclined to support other ways of governing, and, despite the overwhelming power of the German army, people were able to take a stand against the regime," Paška said at a wreath-laying ceremony on Bratislava's SNP Square to mark the 63rd anniversary of the uprising.

He added that while former Czechoslovak president Eduard Beneš was fighting fascism in exile, Slovaks armed themselves to oppose it, a move that eventually gave them leverage in post-war negotiations.

Wednesday's wreath-laying ceremony in Bratislava was attended by around 300 people, including several MPs, Petržalka Mayor Milan Ftáčnik, representatives of the army, other public officials, and members of the Anti-fascism Fighters Association.

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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