Turkey increasingly popular among Slovak tourists

Turkey is currently enjoying great popularity among Slovak holiday travellers, with as many as 16,946 tourists visiting the country in the first six months of this year, it was reported on August 29. This is an increase of 52 percent year-on-year.

Among the destinations most frequently visited by Slovaks in Turkey between January-March were the city of Istanbul, the Cappadocia region, and the ancient town of Efes (Ephesus). Between April-June, Slovak tourists preferred spas, golf resorts, and sightseeing tours.

A real boom in tourism has been observed in Istanbul and eastern parts of Turkey.
"Slovaks choose Turkey thanks to the favourable prices for services, which they are largely satisfied with," said Ozcan Hergul, commercial adviser to the Turkish Embassy in Vienna, which also covers Slovakia.

"Economic growth and higher salaries in Central and Eastern Europe have resulted in more interest in booking stays at Turkish destinations. We're glad that tourists from this part of Europe are beginning to trust Turkey," Hergul said. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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