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CULTURE SHORTS

Foreigners to study cultural heritage

A GROUP of foreigners will study the protection and development of cultural heritage during the upcoming academic year in Svätý Jur, the TASR newswire wrote.
"They will arrive from the United States, Serbia, Croatia and Lithuania," Helena Bakaljarová from the Academia Istropolitana Nova (AIN) educational institution told TASR.

A GROUP of foreigners will study the protection and development of cultural heritage during the upcoming academic year in Svätý Jur, the TASR newswire wrote.

"They will arrive from the United States, Serbia, Croatia and Lithuania," Helena Bakaljarová from the Academia Istropolitana Nova (AIN) educational institution told TASR.

The study programme will start in October 2007 and end in June 2008.

The institution has already selected some Slovak students for the programme, but will enroll more in September. The only conditions are a university degree and knowledge of English.

AIN started the programme in 1997 and trains people through lectures, workshops, and trips abroad.

"We had to take a two-year break," Bakaljarová said, "but we have restarted thanks to support from the Sainsbury Family Charitable Trust in England."

Bakaljarová said many of those who have gone through the programme now work in the area of cultural heritage in state, public or private institutions.

Prepared by Jana Liptáková

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