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Parliament open house draws hundreds

SEVERAL hundred curious people from all over Slovakia got an up-close look at their parliament on Open House Day on September 1.

SEVERAL hundred curious people from all over Slovakia got an up-close look at their parliament on Open House Day on September 1.

The tradition of the Open House Day, held on the anniversary of the Slovak Constitution, was revived after a six-year intermission, the TASR newswire wrote.

In the new parliament building next to Bratislava Castle, visitors were able to see the debate chamber, the wings where parliamentary chairs and vice-chairs work and party caucus rooms, and meet some members of parliament.

The parliament also opened to the public its ceremonial premises in Bratislava Castle, and the historical parliament building at Župné Square.

Speaker of Parliament Pavol Paška said he was pleased that so many people were interested in the event. He explained that Open House Day was revived because people demanded it.

"I would appreciate it if parliament wasn't open for people only for events like these, but 24 hours a day, and during its sessions as well," he said.

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