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Many Slovaks buying Hungarian property

The traditional Hungarian border region of Transdanubia, and the part near Bratislava in particular, has seen a property boom lately, with Slovaks buying houses and land worth a total of Sk250 million (€7.4 million) over the past 12 months, real estate agents confirmed on September 19. The trend has been facilitated by mortgages provided by Hungarian banks.

"Real estate in the Hungarian region of Transdanubia is at least 30 percent cheaper than in the city of Bratislava and its surroundings. While 15 years ago around five to six homes per year were sold here, last year saw sales of 20-25 houses per month,” said Igor Heriban, the CEO of the Hungarian Coral KIM Bt real estate from the border town of Rajka, which is only around 20 kilometres away from the centre of Bratislava.

"Prices in Transdanubia are still lower [than in Slovaki], even if demand from Slovaks is driving them up,” said National Real Estate Agencies Association general secretary Martin Lazík. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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