Slovakia still attractive to investors

According to the latest World Bank analysis, Slovakia is the world's 32nd best place for doing business, the Sme daily reported on September 27. This means the times of analysts calling Slovakia "the most reform-oriented country in the world" could be gone. As far as the quality of labour is concerned, Slovakia is ranked 78th out of about two hundred countries. The ranking for "setting up business" does not favour Slovakia, either. A businessman wanting to start up a business in the country must undergo as many as eight different procedures that will take 25 working days.

The Doing Business analysis, which has been issued annually by the World Bank for the fifth time, is also well known for its unique writing style.

For example, the labour market chapter begins with a story about selecting musicians for a symphonic orchestra set in the 1970s in America. The situation is somewhat strange given that the orchestra plays behind a curtain and the evaluators don't see the players. The result - the number of female players hired was 75 percent higher than when the evaluators could see the gender of the players. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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