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Elderly represent largest share of ombudsman's agenda

Ombudsman Pavel Kandráč reported at a press conference in Bratislava on October 1 that he had already resolved more than 3,600 cases submitted by pensioners and dealt with more than 8,000 issues related to social and civic law.

"Issues concerning the elderly represent approximately a third of our agenda," said Kandráč, adding that many older people feel discriminated against because of their age.

The Office of the Ombudsman was established in 2002 and currently employs 21 lawyers in 11 regional offices. According to head of the office, Henrieta Antalová, some 80 percent of the cases are related to the problems of the elderly. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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