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One of separated conjoined twins dies

One of the conjoined twins thought to have been successfully separated by Slovak doctors in mid-September died early on Thursday, October 4, the Children's Anesthesiology and Intensive Medicine Clinic informed the media. The clinic is part of the Bratislava Teaching Hospital in the district of Kramáre.

Conjoined twins Marek and Michal Mueller were born on April 11 this year. They were joined at the chest and shared a liver and gall bladder. In mid-September, a team of surgeons successfully separated the twin brothers in the second such operation ever performed in Slovakia. The life-saving surgery lasted about twenty hours. The boys had started to have difficulties breathing, as their lungs could not fully develop.

However, as the doctors expected, complications arose. Marek contracted a serious infection and in spite of intensive treatment and life support, multiple organ failure and brain damage followed, and his nervous system broke down. His brother Michal had to have intestinal surgery three times in the last few days. Doctors are still trying to save his life. SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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