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UNHCR: Mustafa Labsi shouldn't be extradited to Algeria

Slovakia should not extradite Mustafa Labsi, the Algerian who is suspected of co-operating with the international terrorist network al-Qaida, to Algeria because the Slovak Asylum Act should apply to him, according to the director of the UN refugee agency (UNHCR), Peter Kresák.

Speaking on October 8, the former MP and constitutional expert said that according to the information they have collected, they suspect there is a danger that Labsi would be tortured and inhumanely treated in Algeria. That's why they were convinced he should be protected from extradition, Kresák said.

Labsi has said several times that he was afraid of being sent back to Algeria.

The Migration Office has allegedly rejected Labsi's application for asylum in Slovakia. However, he can still appeal through a lawyer provided to him by UNHCR, two independent sources that don't wish to be named said.

Labsi, who was arrested illegally crossing the Slovak-Austrian border, has been in custody in Bratislava since May, awaiting word on whether or not he will be extradited to Algeria. When he asked for asylum, the extradition process was suspended.

"If asylum was granted to my client, the extradition to Algeria would be unacceptable," Labsi's lawyer, Milan Menyhart, told TASR several weeks ago.

If the asylum is not granted to the Algerian, the final decision on his extradition will be made by Slovakia's Interior Ministry.

-TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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