Survey: Nearly half of Slovaks consider changing job

According to a recent survey published on October 16, as many as 47 percent of Slovaks are considering, or actively seeking, to change their job. While 9 percent are keen on finding another job, a further 38 percent are thinking about a change and are keeping an eye on job offers.

The survey, carried out by the Ipsos Loyalty agency on behalf of ACCOR Services, was conducted in the first half of 2007 on a sample of 993 employees in eight European countries, including Slovakia. Slovaks often see their work as routine, as confirmed by 37 percent of the respondents. For most Czechs, Italians, French people and Belgians, meanwhile, work is viewed as a form of security.

The group of Slovaks who are least likely to consider changing jobs are managers, with nearly 64 percent in this category satisfied with their posts. The least satisfied are employees working for private companies with domestic capital, with one in ten actively seeking to leave, and a further 43 percent keeping an eye on job offers. Turks, Belgians and Czechs are the least likely to be looking to switch jobs, while Romanians have the itchiest feet.

According to the survey, only 18 percent of Slovak respondents link their work to pleasant feelings, while just 13 percent associate it with security and certainty. The survey didn't canvass the opinions of company owners, freelancers, farmers or self-employed workers. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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