Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Survey: Nearly half of Slovaks consider changing job

According to a recent survey published on October 16, as many as 47 percent of Slovaks are considering, or actively seeking, to change their job. While 9 percent are keen on finding another job, a further 38 percent are thinking about a change and are keeping an eye on job offers.

The survey, carried out by the Ipsos Loyalty agency on behalf of ACCOR Services, was conducted in the first half of 2007 on a sample of 993 employees in eight European countries, including Slovakia. Slovaks often see their work as routine, as confirmed by 37 percent of the respondents. For most Czechs, Italians, French people and Belgians, meanwhile, work is viewed as a form of security.

The group of Slovaks who are least likely to consider changing jobs are managers, with nearly 64 percent in this category satisfied with their posts. The least satisfied are employees working for private companies with domestic capital, with one in ten actively seeking to leave, and a further 43 percent keeping an eye on job offers. Turks, Belgians and Czechs are the least likely to be looking to switch jobs, while Romanians have the itchiest feet.

According to the survey, only 18 percent of Slovak respondents link their work to pleasant feelings, while just 13 percent associate it with security and certainty. The survey didn't canvass the opinions of company owners, freelancers, farmers or self-employed workers. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

Crematorium in Bratislava is an architectural revelation Photo

Those who have experienced farewells in other crematoria know what makes it special. Now the best work by the architect Ferdinand Milučký is getting a monograph

Crematorium in Bratislava by architect Ferdinand Milučký

What kind of expectations do some Slovaks have for world leaders?

Among EU member states, opinions of the United States declined in all but two — Poland (which makes some sense) and Slovakia (which does not).

Donald Trump

Crates and boxes. Slovaks discover new ways of grocery shopping

Farmer’s boxes are gaining customers in Slovakia as people slowly become more conscious about quality and the origin of the food they eat.

Foreigners: Top 10 events in Bratislava Video

Tips for the top 10 events in the capital between January 19 and January 28, plus regular services in different languages, training, temporary exhibitions and highlights of the year.

Scandi 4