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Poll: Most Slovaks oppose Hlinka Act

Up to 54 percent of Slovak citizens definitely wouldn't support, or would prefer not to support, the proposed act recognising the role played by politician and priest Andrej Hlinka in the formation of the Slovak nation and state, a recent poll showed.

The poll, which was carried out by the FOCUS agency on behalf of the Institute for Public Affairs, found that only 25 percent of the respondents would support or would prefer to support the act, while 21 percent didn't know.

The respondents were also asked the question: “Which historical figures are you most proud of, and which are you most ashamed of?” Hlinka was placed fourth on the positive list, chosen by only 8.5 percent of the respondents.

Ahead of Hlinka were Alexander Dubček, the Slovak politician and briefly leader of Czechoslovakia, who was the leading figure in the Prague Spring movement of 1968 (33.8 percent); Milan Rastislav Štefánik, Slovak politician, diplomat and astronomer from the early 20th century (32.7 percent); and Ľudovít Štúr, the politician, writer, poet, linguist, and leading figure of the Slovak national revival movement under the Austro-Hungarian Empire in the 19th century (20.6 percent).

Hlinka was third on the list of negative figures with 7.2 percent. Ahead of him were Jozef Tiso, president of the fascist wartime Slovak State from 1939-1945 (21.6 percent); and Gustáv Husák, Czechoslovakia's socialist president from 1975-1989 (8.8 percent).

The poll surveyed a sample of 1,067 respondents from October 2-9.

-TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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