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Public Policy Institute opposes act on Hlinka

The Public Policy Institute (PPI) considers it unacceptable that people's viewpoint on Slovakia's history be regulated by law, Martin Kamenský and Peter Bachratý of the PPI said on October 22.

Protection of historical personalities by law would seriously limit a historian's freedom to carry out research as well as public discussion on these figures. "We don't see any reasonable argument to limit these freedoms. On the contrary, we think it's important that figures from our history be subject to historical research funded by public resources," they said.

According to the PPI representatives, the recent efforts of some MPs to pass controversial legislation recognizing the role played by politician and priest Andrej Hlinka (1864-1938) in the formation of the Slovak nation and state represent only a marginal issue, which has been artificially trumped up for the media in order to divide Slovak society. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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