Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Justice Ministry reveals changes to Criminal Code

The Justice Ministry on October 22 revealed proposed changes to the Criminal Code that are aimed at speeding up trials and were submitted for comments to other ministries last week. "The changes in question concern a trial or public hearing ... The prime witness, among other changes, will be expected to co-operate right up until the perpetrators are sentenced," said Štefan Minárik, head of the ministry's criminal law section.

He said the ministry was proposing that misdemeanors and less serious offenses should be tried by a single judge, with cases involving serious crimes presided over by a group of judges (or senate). In addition, plaintiffs should no longer have to take their cases, too, to a civil court in order to sue for damages.

Minárik further stated that during the drafting of the proposals the ministry took into account the opinion of professional communities, and has invited comments from Christian Democrat (KDH) MP and former justice minister Daniel Lipšic, who criticized the measures on October 19 as being designed to make things easier for those suspected of corruption or organized crime. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

Government ignores anticorruption demands Photo

Protesters gave the government two weeks to fulfil their demands.

Blog: We can always count on the nerds…

Brands need to focus on doing good and that this approach is the only option if they want to stay relevant, credible and even profitable, says Thomas Kolster.

Thomas Kolster speaking

Drivers in Bratislava should prepare for worse traffic

Dissatisfied taxi drivers will go on a protest ride from Petržalka to Lamač on Wednesday.

Taxi drivers protested against Uber already in 2015.

Blog: Underground economy flourishes in the queues

A foreigners' real experience at the foreigners’ police department in Bratislava.

Foreign investors said they would welcome less bureaucracy in Slovakia.