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Dubček remembered on the anniversary of his death

Fifteen years after the death of the most famous representative of the Prague Spring, Alexander Dubček, most Slovaks see his ambiguous acts in a positive light, the Sme daily wrote.

Dubček, the first secretary of the communist party's central committee, pushed for the liberalisation of the communist regime. As a result, he was quickly pushed out of the way after the invasion of the Warsaw Pact troops in August 1968.

A recent survey by the Institute for Public Affairs (IVO) independent think-tank showed that the legendary reform-minded communist is the most popular personality of Slovak history, together with Milan Rastislav Štefánik. Many Slovaks are proud of him despite his failures, and they see him as a victim of history whose work was stopped by the tanks of the Warsaw Pact armed forces.

The circumstances of Dubček's death in a car accident 15 years ago have led to several conspiracy theories, despite the results of two independent investigations by police.

-SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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