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Government to inform Brussels about plan on second pillar

On November 15, the Pravda wrote that the cabinet plans to promise the European Union that insurance premiums into the second pillar will not be cut in favour of social security provider Sociálna Poisťovňa.

The daily reminded its readers that one year ago, PM Fico considered a change to insurance premiums as one way of making up Sociálna Poisťovňa's deficit. The cabinet must now prove to European institutions that Slovakia can deal with its ageing population without causing a significant negative impact on the public finance.

As a result of an ageing population, the public finance deficit could increase by around 13 percent from the economy's performance by 2050. One of conditions for meeting the Euro is a maximum public finance deficit of three percent. In following years, the country should keep cutting its deficit by at least 0.5 percent. SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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