Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

One in two Slovak employees unhappy with salary

According to a recent survey of workers in Slovakia, the most important factor when it comes to job satisfaction is the pay.

Salary levels were viewed as the most important indicator of satisfaction by 97 percent of those questioned. The survey also showed that one in two Slovaks is dissatisfied with his or her salary.

The survey, Employee Satisfaction and Motivation Barometer, was carried out by Accor Services on a representative sample of economically-active people in Slovakia and seven other European countries.

The results of the survey also show that Slovak employees are most satisfied with their level of independence at work (84 percent). More than 70 percent of employees here are also happy with their working hours, environment, conditions, and the balance between their work and private lives. The lowest level of satisfaction was in the categories of salary and benefits.

The highest level of satisfaction with salaries (65 percent) and benefits (71 percent) was expressed by employees working for private companies with mixed capital. The lowest levels of satisfaction were recorded among those working for the state administration – with salary only 40 percent and with benefits only 37 percent - and in state-owned firms, where only 37 percent are satisfied with their salaries and 41 percent with the benefits.

The highest levels of dissatisfaction with salaries were found in Romania (70 percent) and Turkey (68 percent), but discontent was also high in countries like France and Italy (both 67 percent).

-TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

Unknown places worth visiting in Slovakia Photo

The year 2016 brought record numbers for tourism in Slovakia.

Špania Dolina, the runner-up in the Village of the Year competition.

This is not a game, and these are not children

If politicians care about the future of the country, they need to offer young protesters with specific demands more than the just same old vague assurances.

Nu Dance festival changes date and the finale coincides with International Dance Day

The festival of contemporary dance has not just moved in time but also from the stage to the streets, encouraging public participation.

Renan Martins: Let Me Die in My Footsteps

(W)Rapping up two worlds in one music

The Fjúžn festival annually presents interesting musical projects from people who cross borders, literally or symbolically. This year, the headliner of the main festival concert on April 22 will be the French-Iraqi…

The Iraqi-French band Aiwa