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Fico tops political trustworthiness chart in November

The Slovak prime minister and chair of the ruling Smer party, Robert Fico, remains the most trusted politician in Slovakia.

A public opinion poll by the MVK agency shows that Fico had the trust of 39.4 percent of Slovak citizens. President Ivan Gašparovič follows with 26.9 percent. The third most trustworthy politician in Slovakia is Iveta Radičová, deputy-chair of the opposition SDKÚ and former labour minister, with 18.4 percent.

The top five is rounded off by Ján Slota, the chair of the junior coalition SNS party, with 16.3 percent; and Smer Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák, with 13.3 percent.

Slota is also seen as the most untrustworthy politician, with 37.2 percent. The chair of the opposition SDKÚ and former PM Mikuláš Dzurinda follows with 33.7 percent, then comes HZDS chair Vladimír Mečiar, with 32.7 percent. Fico was named as untrustworthy by 21.6 percent of the respondents.

Each respondent was asked to name three trusted politicians, so the results add up to more than 100 percent. The poll was conducted on a sample of 1,114 respondents in early November.

-SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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