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HZDS says coalition crisis can be solved

Agriculture Minister Miroslav Jureňa says his HZDS party, led by Vladimir Mečiar, has had a lot of dirt "dumped" on it during the recent coalition crisis involving the Slovak Land Fund (SPF).

The crisis was sparked by a questionable land transfer carried out by the SPF.

More than 4,000 people work in the agriculture department, which runs the SPF, and the minister cannot take responsibility for all of them, Jureňa added.

It is too soon to talk about political responsibility for the SPF matter, he continued. The case should be investigated by investigators and courts.

He said there were many strange circumstances in the case, which make him think somebody is playing a backstage game. It was also strange that the scandal broke when he was leaving for a 10-day working visit to Latin America, he said.

HZDS secretary Zdenka Kramplová said the situation was “absolutely normal”, but she says the coalition parties must communicate with each other and not through the media. She said the HZDS is standing behind its minister.

-SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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