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Divinský: Brain drain is normal

An expert on foreign migration, Boris Divinský, said that most Slovaks going abroad do so for no more than a year and in order to make money, the Sme daily wrote on November 22.

According to him, brain drain is normal for any nation, but the difference with Slovakia is that the 20 percent of emigrants who are university-educated account for nearly a third of all university graduates each year.

According to Divinsky, the problem arises in differences between immigrants and emigrants, with no replacements for our departing doctors, for example. Immigrants coming in from richer countries take high-ranking management positions, while no one is coming in to fill fresh graduate posts.

Older European Union countries, such as Germany, are also losing out due to the brain drain, but the departures there are offset by the arrival of people from countries such as Slovakia.

-TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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