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Hungarian foreign minister critical of Slovakia

HUNGARIAN Foreign Affairs Minister Kinga Göncz used a meeting in Slovakia to criticise the Slovak government's policy towards Hungary, the Czech ČTK newswire wrote.

She also indirectly criticised the recent resolution of the Slovak parliament about the inviolability of the post-war Beneš Decrees.

Göncz met with her Slovak counterpart, Ján Kubiš, in the southern Slovak town of Štúrovo on November 16 to sign agreements on building two bridges over the Ipeľ River.

Hungary is getting contradictory signals from the Slovak government, Göncz said.

"On one hand, we hear angry remarks against Hungarians; and on the other hand, there are gestures and messages that it is worth keeping mutual relations at a high level," she said.

"The government is not sending double signals," Kubiš argued. "The government has only one agenda and it is fulfilling it. Its signals are signals of positive steps."

The recent tensions in Slovak-Hungarian relations peaked when Slovak Prime Minister Robert Fico accused Hungarian President László Sólyomi of misusing a private visit to southern Slovakia for political goals. Sólyomi made the visit after Slovakia passed its resolution on the Beneš Decrees, the post-Second World War policy that saw thousands of ethnic Hungarian Slovaks deported and their property confiscated.

Slovak government representatives reiterated that they want to keep good neighbourly relations with Hungary, and they will not restrict the current position of the Hungarian minority in Slovakia.

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