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BUSINESS SHORTS

Johnson Controls opens business centre

JOHNSON Controls, which makes auto interiors, seats and other car products, opened its Automotive Business Centre in Bratislava on November 20.

"This is a further step in the company's expansion," said the business centre's director general, Richard Johnson, the SITA newswire wrote.

The Central and Eastern European region has been undergoing dramatic changes, with growing economies and a rising demand for cars, Johnson said. This has a definite influence on carmakers.

"Johnson Controls' suppliers are expanding and they expect the same from us," he said.

The company hopes its new centre, which is to employ about 350 people, will boost the firm's position in Slovakia and support clients in the quickly-developing region. It will support all of the company's European business activities by housing its financial, purchasing and information technology divisions.

The centre in Bratislava will be the only facility of its kind in Europe, and its activities will complement Johnson Control's European automotive headquarters in Burscheid, Germany.

Johnson Controls has been operating in Slovakia since 1993. Currently, it employs 3,300 people in seven locations throughout Slovakia.

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