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Police: Seized uranium could have been used to produce dirty bomb

The radioactive material seized by Slovak and Hungarian police late on November 28 could possibly be used to produce a dirty bomb, Slovak Police Corps vice-president Michal Kopčík announced at a press conference in Bratislava on November 29.

"The seized radioactive material could be used for terrorist attacks," Kopčík said.

Police captured three men - a Ukrainian and two Hungarian citizens, aged 40, 49 and 51 - crossing the Hungarian border into Slovakia carrying 481.4 grams of enriched uranium, it was reported. Dangerous material, in the form of powder, was detected in two containers.

For the time being, police have no information on where the uranium was headed. However, it is supposed that it came from a former Soviet Union country.

Police also reported that strict security measures were taken in order not to contaminate the nearby environment. Authorities are assuring the public that there is nothing to be concerned about.

Slovak and Hungarian police have been monitoring the movement of nuclear material since August. At that time, they received information about an offer to sell a radioactive substance of about 1.5 kilos in volume, with a price of some $3,500 per gram.

-TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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